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Psychopharmacologia

, Volume 35, Issue 3, pp 257–271 | Cite as

Pyrazapon (CI-683): A new antianxiety agent

  • B. P. H. Poschel
  • D. A. McCarthy
  • Graham Chen
  • Charles R. Ensor
Animal Studies

Abstract

Pyrazapon, a pyrazolodiazepinone, exerts strong disinhibitory effects on behavior in a variety of animal tests (ingestion of a novel food substance, conditioned conflict, hypothalamic self-stimulation). In tests for sedation, motor depression, and ataxia, weak effects were seen relative to chlordiazepoxide and diazepam. Pyrazapon also shows considerable ability to protect against pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsions in acute tests. However, much tolerance develops to this effect in the course of daily treatments. Tolerance does not develop, on the other hand, to the behavioral disinhibitory effect. No untoward pharmacodynamic effects were observed at doses several fold greater than those producing the principle pharmacologic effects. Pyrazapon may well be an effective antianxiety drug with very weak sedative side effects.

Key words

Pyrazapon CI-683 Antianxiety Agent Response Disinhibition Tolerance Development 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. P. H. Poschel
    • 1
  • D. A. McCarthy
    • 1
  • Graham Chen
    • 1
  • Charles R. Ensor
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyParke, Davis and Company Research and Development DivisionAnn Arbor

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