Aesthetic Plastic Surgery

, Volume 17, Issue 4, pp 339–344 | Cite as

Clinical experience with the medpor porous polyethylene implant

  • Tadeusz Wellisz
Article

Abstract

The Medpor porous polyethylene implant is a highly stable and somewhat flexible porous alloplast that has been shown to exhibit rapid tissue ingrowth into its pores. A total of 116 Medpor implants were placed in 70 patients over a four-year period. Implants were used for the chin, malar area, nasal reconstruction, ear reconstruction, orbital reconstruction, and the correction of craniofacial contour deformities. Many of these implants were placed in areas long considered problematic such as areas of thin soft tissue coverage, extensive scarring, and severe facial burns. Nine complications occurred including seven exposures, all of which occurred in areas of minimal soft tissue coverage. Because of the rapid vascularization of the implants, only two implants were removed, both from the columella. On the basis of our results, it is felt that the Medpor implant is an excellent alternative to existing implant materials. The implant is easy to shape; it is strong yet somewhat flexible; it is remarkably stable; and it exhibits tissue ingrowth into its pores.

Key words

Porous polyethylene Medpor Alloplasts Implants Craniofacial reconstruction 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tadeusz Wellisz
    • 1
  1. 1.Plastic and Reconstructive SurgeryRancho Los Amigos Medical CenterDowneyUSA

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