Mycopathologia

, Volume 109, Issue 2, pp 75–87 | Cite as

New antifungal agents for the systemic mycoses

  • Samuel M. Ringel
Article

Abstract

The azoles are the prominent broad spectrum oral antifungal agents in use or under clinical investigation for the systemic mycoses. This class of antifungal agents is represented by the marketed drug ketoconazole (Nizoral) and the experimental triazoles furthest along in clinical trials in the United States, itraconazole and fluconazole. Ketoconazole use is limited by its side effect profile and activity spectrum. Itraconazole appears to be better tolerated and less toxic to liver function, does not cause adrenal suppression and is more active against Aspergillus and Sporothrix schenckii. Fluconazole appears to be a highly promising agent due its highly favorable pharmacokinetic profile; it is water soluble, is well tolerated, is not metabolized to inactive constituents, it has a long half-life and, unlike the other azoles, high cerebrospinal fluid levels are readily attained for consideration in meningeal mycoses. It remains to be determined what place these new triazoles have in managing immunosuppressed patients including those with acquired immune deficiency syndrome known as AIDS. Other experimental antifungal agents, including ambruticin, amphotericin B methyl ester and saramycetin are also described. Sales figures are presented of drugs marketed in the United States for the systemic mycoses and reflect the growing problem of fungal diseases in the population.

Keywords

Fluconazole Triazole Itraconazole Ketoconazole Azole 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samuel M. Ringel
    • 1
  1. 1.TamaracUSA

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