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Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology

, Volume 23, Issue 6, pp 392–394 | Cite as

Pharmacokinetics of prednisolone in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

  • Imtiaz Choonara
  • John Wheeldon
  • Phil Rayner
  • Mike Blackburn
  • Ian Lewis
Short Communication Prednisolone, Pharmacokinetics, Leukaemia, Children

Summary

The pharmacokinetics of soluble oral prednisolone were studied during induction therapy in six children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. There was a three- to four-fold variation in the pharmacokinetics of total and free prednisolone. For total prednisolone, the mean elimination half-life was relatively short (1.37 h) and the total clearance, relatively high (15.1 ml min-1 kg-1). The mean free fraction was high (0.37).

Keywords

Cancer Research Prednisolone Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Induction Therapy Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Imtiaz Choonara
    • 1
  • John Wheeldon
    • 1
  • Phil Rayner
    • 1
  • Mike Blackburn
    • 1
  • Ian Lewis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Paediatrics and Child HealthSt. James's University HospitalLeedsUK

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