Psychopharmacology

, Volume 72, Issue 1, pp 113–115 | Cite as

Behavioral facilitation following chronic administration of N-n-propylnorapomorphine

  • Richard E. Wilcox
  • William H. Riffee
  • Pih-Chun Chen
  • Sam HammettIII
  • Robert V. Smith
Short Reports

Abstract

Chronic administration of drugs which interfere with normal neurotransmission within animal nervous tissue (e.g. neurotransmitter receptor antagonists) is known to result in the development of behavioral supersensitivity. During recent years, evidence has been presented which indicates that neurotransmitter receptor agonists also produce behavioral supersensitivity. This study shows that, using stereotypic cageclimbing behavior in mice, chronic administration of apomorphine, and N-n-propylnorapomorphine (two direct-acting dopamine agonists) and d-amphetamine (an indirect dopamine agonist) produced an enhanced behavioral response to a test dose of apomorphine 4, 8 and 12 days after cessation of chronic drug injections.

Key words

Behavioral supersensitivity Dopamine Stereotypic cage-climbing Apomorphine N-n-Propylnomorphine d-Amphetamine 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard E. Wilcox
    • 1
  • William H. Riffee
    • 1
  • Pih-Chun Chen
    • 1
  • Sam HammettIII
    • 1
  • Robert V. Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology and Drug Dynamics InstituteCollege of Pharmacy University of TexasAustinUSA

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