Virchows Archiv A

, Volume 374, Issue 4, pp 339–351 | Cite as

An ultrastructural study of the red pulp of the spleen and the liver in unstable hemoglobin hemolytic anemia

  • Noboru Matsumoto
  • Tokuhiro Ishihara
  • Hironobu Adachi
  • Mutsuo Takahashi
  • Shiro Miwa
  • Fumiya Uchino
  • Kohachiro Sugiyama
  • Koichi Suzuki
  • Toshiyasu Sugiura
Article

Summary

Electron microscopic observations on the process of red cell destruction in the spleen and liver of a patient with congenital Heinz body hemolytic anemia, associated with a new variant of unstable hemoglobin, are reported. Two major mechanisms of destruction of Heinz body-containing red cells were noted. One was phagocytosis of these cells in toto by cordal macrophages. The other mechanism, though less significant quantitatively, was intravascular hemolysis of injured red cells in the splenic microvasculature. In the liver, phagocytosis of damaged red cells by Kupffer cells was rare and there was no evidence of intravascular hemolysis in this organ. These morphological findings, together with almost complete recovery from hemolysis following splenectomy, indicated that Heinz body-containing red cells were removed from the circulation predominantly by the spleen. In contrast to experimental Heinz body anemia in animals, Heinz bodies were present even in the nucleated red cells.

Key words

Spleen Liver Heinz bodies Unstable hemoglobin 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Noboru Matsumoto
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tokuhiro Ishihara
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hironobu Adachi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mutsuo Takahashi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shiro Miwa
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fumiya Uchino
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kohachiro Sugiyama
    • 1
    • 2
  • Koichi Suzuki
    • 1
    • 2
  • Toshiyasu Sugiura
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine and PathologyYamaguchi University School of MedicineUbe
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsNagoya City University Medical SchoolNagoyaJapan

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