Advertisement

Psychopharmacology

, Volume 78, Issue 2, pp 128–130 | Cite as

Partial improvement in negative schizophrenic symptoms after amphetamine

  • Burton Angrist
  • Eric Peselow
  • Morton Rubinstein
  • June Corwin
  • John Rotrosen
Original Investigations

Abstract

In stable schizophrenic outpatients with predominantly “defect state” symptomatology amphetamine caused a reduction in negative symptoms that was statistically significant but not complete (i.e. these symptoms remained clinically discernible). The possibility that dopaminergic hypofunction contributes some elements to the schizophrenic defect state is presented, along with some limited data compatible with this concept.

These findings are compared to prior studies in recently hospitalized schizophrenic subjects, and discussed with respect to recent theoretical concepts regrding the role of dopamine in schizophrenic psychopathology

Key words

Amphetamine Dopamine Schizophrenia Negative schizophrenic symptoms 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Angrist B, Sathananthan G, Gershon S (1973) Behavioral effects of l-dopa in schizophrenic patients. Psychopharmacologia 31:1–12Google Scholar
  2. Angrist B, Rotrosen J, Gershon S (1980A) Responses to apomorphine amphetamine and neuroleptics in schizophrenic subjects. Psychopharmacology 67:31–38Google Scholar
  3. Angrist B, Rotrosen J, Gershon S (1980B) Differential effects of amphetamine and neuroleptics on negative vs. positive symptoms in schizophrenia. Psychopharmacology 72:17–19Google Scholar
  4. Angrist B, Rotrosen J (1981) Dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic elements in schizophrenia. In: Corsini GU, Gessa GL (eds) Apomorphine and other dopamimetics, Vol 2: Clinical Pharmacology, Raven, New York, pp 33–38Google Scholar
  5. Bowers MB (1974) Central dopamine turnover in schizophrenic syndromes. Arch Gen Psychiatry 31:50–54Google Scholar
  6. Crow TJ (1980) Molecular pathology in schizophrenia: More than one disease process? Br Med J 280:66–68Google Scholar
  7. DSM II Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (1968) Committee on Nomenclature and Statistics. American Psychiatric Association, 1700 So. N.W., Washington, DCGoogle Scholar
  8. Economo C (1931) Encephalitis lethargica—its sequelae and treatment. K.O. Newman (Trans). University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  9. Gerlach J, Luhdorf K (1975) The effect of l-dopa on young patients with simple schizophrenia treated with neuroleptic drugs. Psychopharmacologia 44:105–110Google Scholar
  10. Guy W (1976) E.C.D.E.U. assessment manual for psychopathology. U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Washington, DC, pp 160, 162, 167Google Scholar
  11. Hope JM, Calloway E, Sands SL (1951) Intravenous Pervitan and the psychopathology of schizophrenia. Dis Nery Syst 12:67–72Google Scholar
  12. Inanaga K, Inoue K, Tachibana H, Oshima M, Katorii T (1972) Effects of l-dopa in schizophrenia. Folia Psychiatr Neurol Jpn 26:145–157Google Scholar
  13. Janowsky DS, El Yousef K, Davis JM, Sekerke J (1973) Provocation of schizophrenic symptoms by intravenous methylphenidate. Arch Gen Psychiatry 28:185–191Google Scholar
  14. Kornetsky C (1976) Hyporesponsivity of chronic schizophrenic patients to dextroamphetamine. Arch Gen Psychiatry 33:1425–1428Google Scholar
  15. Ogura C, Kishimoto A, Nakao T (1976) Clinical effect of l-dopa on schizophrenia. Curr Ther Res 20:308–318Google Scholar
  16. Post RM, Fink E, Carpenter WT, Goodwin FK (1975) Cerebrospinal fluid amine metabolites in acute schizophrenia. Arch Gen Psychiatry 32:1063–1069Google Scholar
  17. Sachs O (1976) Awakenings. Vintage Books (Division of Random House), New YorkGoogle Scholar
  18. Van Kammen DP (1981) d-Amphetamine and schizophrenia: Behavioral, pharmacological and physiological observations. In: Angrist et al. (eds) Advances in the Biosciences. Pergamon, Oxford New York, pp 43–47Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Burton Angrist
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eric Peselow
    • 1
    • 2
  • Morton Rubinstein
    • 1
    • 2
  • June Corwin
    • 1
    • 2
  • John Rotrosen
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Psychiatry ServiceVeterans Administration Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryNew York University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

Personalised recommendations