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Psychopharmacology

, Volume 72, Issue 2, pp 161–165 | Cite as

Dose effects of secobarbital in a Sternberg memory scanning task

  • Harold L. Williams
  • Orvis H. RundellJr.
  • Ladngrave T. Smith
Original Investigations

Abstract

Mean reaction times obtained in a Sternberg memory-scanning task were examined for the effects of secobarbital at two doses (1.47 mg/kg and 2.94 mg/kg) spanning the dose range commonly used in clinical practice. Both doses slowed reaction time significantly, with a more pronounced effect at the higher dose. The discriminability of the probe stimulus interacted with the barbiturate, producing a hyperadditive effect on reaction time, but only at the high dose. There were no other significant interaction effects involving the drug. These data are interpreted as additional support for an hypothesis localizing the effects of secobarbital to stimulus-encoding stages in the reaction process.

Key words

Barbiturates Information processing Reaction time 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harold L. Williams
    • 1
  • Orvis H. RundellJr.
    • 1
  • Ladngrave T. Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Oklahoma Center for Alcohol and Drug Related Studies, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of Oklahoma at Oklahoma City, Health Sciences CenterOklahoma CityUSA

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