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Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 153, Issue 3, pp 311–324 | Cite as

Physical mapping of BglII, BamHI, EcoRI, HindIII and PstI Restriction fragments of bacteriophage P1 DNA

  • Brigitte Bächi
  • Werner Arber
Article

Summary

A cleavage map of bacteriophage P1 DNA was established by reciprocal double digestion with various restriction endonucleases. The enzymes used and, in parenthesis, the number of their cleavage sites on the P1clts genome are: PstI (1), HindIII (3), BglII (11), BamHI (14) and EcoRI (26). The relative order of the PstI, HindIII and BglII sites, as well as the order of 13 out of the 14 BamHI sites and of 17 out of the 26 EcoRI sites was determined. The P1 genome was divided into 100 map units and the PstI site was arbitrarily chosen as reference point at map unit 20.

DNA packaging into phage heads starts preferentially at map unit 92 and it proceeds towards higher map units. The two inverted repeat sequences of P1 DNA map about at units 30 and 34.

Keywords

Cleavage Site Inverted Repeat Relative Order BamHI Site EcoRI Site 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brigitte Bächi
    • 1
  • Werner Arber
    • 1
  1. 1.Biozentrum der Universität BaselBaselSwitzerland

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