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Psychopharmacologia

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 319–326 | Cite as

Catecholamines and memory: Enhanced verbal learning during l-DOPA administration

  • Dennis L. Murphy
  • George M. Henry
  • Herbert Weingartner
Human Pharmacology

Abstract

Verbal learning was measured during the administration of l-DOPA in large oral doses to depressed patients. Longer-term memory on two different tasks improved during treatment, while short-term memory (immediate recall) was unaffected. In contrast, the catecholamine synthesis inhibitor α-methyl-p-tyrosine did not alter either memory process.

The effects of l-DOPA on learning may be related to increased arousal produced by this drug.

Key words

l-DOPA Memory α-methyl-p-tyrosine Catecholamines 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis L. Murphy
    • 1
  • George M. Henry
    • 1
  • Herbert Weingartner
    • 2
  1. 1.Section on Psychiatry, Laboratory of Clinical ScienceNational Institute of Mental HealthBethesda
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MarylandBaltimore

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