Psychopharmacology

, Volume 85, Issue 3, pp 277–283 | Cite as

Amphetamine response and relapse risk after depot neuroleptic discontinuation

  • B. Angrist
  • E. Peselov
  • M. Rubinstein
  • A. Wolkin
  • J. Rotrosen
Original Investigations

Abstract

Twenty-five schizophrenic outpatient subjects in a depot neuroleptic discontinuation study received an amphetamine challenge approximately 6 weeks after their last dose. Only five of these showed greater than three-point increases in positive symptoms on the BPRS, and all five relapsed within 30 days of the challenge. The 20 with less than three-point increases in positive symptoms showed extremely variable stability, relapsing from 20–>600 days after the challenge. Thus, increase in positive symptoms after amphetamine may identify a group at risk for rapid relapse after neuroleptic discontinuation, but lack of such a response gives little prognostic information.

Key words

Schizophrenia Amphetamine Neuroleptic discontinuation Relapse prediction 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Angrist
    • 1
  • E. Peselov
    • 1
  • M. Rubinstein
    • 1
  • A. Wolkin
    • 1
  • J. Rotrosen
    • 1
  1. 1.New York VA Medical Center and Department of PsychiatryNYU Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

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