Psychopharmacology

, Volume 70, Issue 3, pp 291–294 | Cite as

Endogenous depression and imipramine levels in the blood

  • Daniel Costa
  • Vasile Predescu
  • Ilena Vişan-Ionescu
  • Tiberiu Ciurezu
Original Investigations

Abstract

Approximate determinations of imipramine plus desmethylimipramine levels in the blood made by a method available in routine clinical chemistry laboratories, in 20 nondelusional endogenous depressives after 3 weeks of treatment (mean dose 130 mg/day, SEM 18.05 mg/day) have shown levels ranging from 10 ng/ml to 494 ng/ml. A positive significant correlation between blood levels and percentage change in scores on the Hamilton scale was found (Spearman's ϱ=0.49 P<0.05). Patients with levels above 85 ng/ml had a significantly better therapeutic response than patients with levels below 85 ng/ml. Among the 11 nonresponders, 8 had low levels, 2 had intermediate levels, and 1 had the highest level of the study. In a given nonresponder, approximate determination of imipramine plus desmethylimipramine in the blood may be useful.

Key words

Endogenous depression Imipramine Blood levels Therapeutic response 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Costa
    • 1
  • Vasile Predescu
    • 1
  • Ilena Vişan-Ionescu
    • 1
  • Tiberiu Ciurezu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryInstitute of Medicine and PharmacyBucharestRomania

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