Psychopharmacology

, Volume 84, Issue 2, pp 200–204 | Cite as

Separate mechanisms for behavioral, cardiovascular, and hormonal responses to dextroamphetamine in man

  • John I. NurnbergerJr
  • Susan Simmons-Alling
  • Linda Kessler
  • Suzanne Jimerson
  • Judith Schreiber
  • Eric Hollander
  • Carol A. Tamminga
  • N. Suzan Nadi
  • David S. Goldstein
  • Elliot S. Gershon
Original Investigations

Abstract

The neurochemical specificity of physiological, biochemical, and psychological responses to dextroamphetamine was tested by pretreating volunteers with haloperidol (0.014 mg/kg IM), proparonol (0.1 mg/kg IV), thymoxamine (0.1 mg/kg IV), or placebo prior to 0.3 mg/kg IV amphetamine. Healthy volunteers (N=12) participated in the studies, but not all volunteers received each drug combination. Haloperidol prevented dextroamphetamine-induced behavioral excitation, but did not significantly affect plasma norepinephrine or pressor responses, whereas propranolol inhibited norepinephrine and pressor responses without influencing excitation or other behavioral responses. Thymoxamine did not affect any of the responses measured. None of the agents significantly affected plasma cortisol or growth hormone responses. The prolactin rise following dextroamphetamine was potentiated by haloperidol. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that behavioral excitation after dextroamphetamine occurs through a dopaminergic mechanism, and pressor responses through a noradrenergic mechanism.

Key words

Dextroamphetamine Mechanism of action Behavioral responses 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • John I. NurnbergerJr
    • 1
  • Susan Simmons-Alling
    • 1
  • Linda Kessler
    • 2
  • Suzanne Jimerson
    • 1
  • Judith Schreiber
    • 3
  • Eric Hollander
    • 1
  • Carol A. Tamminga
    • 4
    • 5
  • N. Suzan Nadi
    • 1
  • David S. Goldstein
    • 6
  • Elliot S. Gershon
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinical Neurogenetics BranchNational Institute of Mental HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Division of Neuropharmacological Drug ProductsU.S. Food and Drug AdministrationRockvilleUSA
  3. 3.Section on Clinical Studies, Neuroscience BranchNational Institute of Mental HealthBethesdaUSA
  4. 4.National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke, Experimental Therapeutics BranchNINCDSBethesdaUSA
  5. 5.Maryland Psychiatric Research CenterBaltimoreUSA
  6. 6.National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Hypertension-Endocrine BranchNHLBIBethesdaUSA

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