Psychopharmacology

, Volume 62, Issue 2, pp 163–167 | Cite as

Evidence of central cholinergic mechanisms in the appearance of affective aggressive behaviour: Dissociation of aggression from autonomic and motor phenomena

  • D. B. Beleslin
  • Ranka Samardžić
Original Investigations

Abstract

Carbachol, muscarine, eserine and neostigmine injected into the cerebral ventricles of conscious cats evoked emotional behaviour with aggression, autonomic and motor phenomena as well as clonic-tonic convulsions. The main and the most impressive feature of the gross behavioural effects of intraventricular carbachol, muscarine, eserine and neostigmine in conscious cats was the affective type of aggression. However, neostigmine produced aggressive behaviour only in about one-quarter of the experiments. After intraventricular hemicholinium-3 and triethylcholine carbachol, muscarine, eserine and neostigmine elicited autonomic and motor phenomena. In these cats cholinomimetics and anticholinesterases evoked only slight hissing and snarling. Choline administered into the cerebral ventricles of hemicholinium-3- and triethylcholine-treated cats restored the emotional behaviour with aggression, autonomic and motor phenomena as well as clonic-tonic convulsions to intraventricular carbachol, muscarine, eserine and neostigmine. The restored gross behavioural changes to eserine were almost of the same intensity, while those to carbachol and muscarine were of lesser intensity than in control cats. From these experiments it is concluded that cholinergic neurones are involved in the appearance of the affective type of aggression resulting from intraventricular carbachol, muscarine, eserine and neostigmine.

Key words

Intraventricular injections Aggression Cholinomimetics Anticholinesterases Cholinergic neurones 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. B. Beleslin
    • 1
  • Ranka Samardžić
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyMedical FacultyBeogradYugoslavia

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