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Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery

, Volume 113, Issue 6, pp 334–336 | Cite as

Collagen turnover after tibial fractures

  • S. Joerring
  • M. Krogsgaard
  • H. Wilbek
  • L. T. Jensen
Clinical Experimental Forum

Abstract

Collagen turnover after tibial fractures was examined in 16 patients with fracture of the tibial diaphysis and in 8 patients with fracture in the tibial condyle area by measuring sequential changes in serological markers of turnover of types I and III collagen for up to 26 weeks after fracture. The markers were the carboxy-terminal extension peptide of type I procollagen (PICP), the amino-terminal extension peptide of type III procollagen (PII-INP), and the pyridinoline cross-linked carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP). The latter is a new serum marker of degradation of type I collagen. A group comparison showed characteristic sequential changes in the turnover of types I and III collagen in fractures of the tibial diaphysis and tibial condyles. The turnover of type III collagen reached a maximum after 2 weeks in both groups. The synthesis of type I collagen reached a maximum after 2 weeks in the diaphyseal fractures and after 6 weeks in the condylar fractures. The degradation of type I collagen increased after 4 days and reached a maximum at 2 weeks in both groups. The interindividual variation was wide. On a group basis, the turnover of types I and III collagen had levelled of within 26 weeks, although some patients had clearly elevated parameters at the end of the observational period. We suggest that delayed healing of tibial diaphyseal fractures is accompanied by an early increase in the turnover of types I and III collagen.

Keywords

Sequential Change Tibial Fracture Serological Marker Observational Period Tibial Diaphysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Joerring
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Krogsgaard
    • 2
  • H. Wilbek
    • 3
  • L. T. Jensen
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Orthopedics URigshospitaletKøbenhavn ØDenmark
  2. 2.Department of OrthopedicsHvidovre HospitalDenmark
  3. 3.Department of OrthopedicsFrederiksberg HospitalDenmark
  4. 4.Department of RheumatologyHvidovre HospitalDenmark

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