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Naturwissenschaften

, Volume 67, Issue 1, pp 21–28 | Cite as

Ökophysiologische Untersuchungen an Pflanzen der Namib-Wüste

  • D. J. von Willert
  • E. Brinckmann
  • B. Scheitler
  • E. -D. Schulze
  • D. A. Thomas
  • S. Treichel
Article

Abstract

The southern Namib desert has a vegetation cover of mainly succulent plants in which species of the Mesembryanthemaceae are predominant. Climatically this area is characterized by hot and dry days, and cool and humid nights with episodic rainfalls only in winter. In this environment a great number of species perform a crassulaceaen acid metabolism (CAM). The responses of these plants to water stress as well as the regulation of CAM in the natural habitat are described and discussed.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. J. von Willert
    • 1
  • E. Brinckmann
    • 1
  • B. Scheitler
    • 1
  • E. -D. Schulze
    • 1
  • D. A. Thomas
    • 1
  • S. Treichel
    • 2
  1. 1.Lehrstuhl für Pflanzenökologie der UniversitätBayreuth
  2. 2.Institut für Botanik der Technischen HochschuleDarmstadt

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