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Archives of Microbiology

, Volume 154, Issue 2, pp 156–161 | Cite as

Stimulation of the methyltetrahydromethanopterin: coenzyme M methyltransferase reaction in cell-free extracts of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum by the heterodisulfide of coenzyme M and 7-mercaptoheptanoylthreonine phosphate

  • Servé W. M. Kengen
  • Piet J. H. Daas
  • Jan T. Keltjens
  • Chris van der Drift
  • Godfried D. Vogels
Original Papers

Abstract

The conversion of formaldehyde to methylcoenzyme M in cell-free extracts of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum was stimulated up to 10-fold by catalytic amounts of the heterodisulfide (CoM-S-S-HTP) of coenzyme M and 7-mercaptoheptanoylthreonine phosphate. The stimulation required the additional presence of ATP, also in catalytic concentrations. ATP and CoM-S-S-HTP were mutually stimulatory on the methylcoenzyme M formation and it was concluded that the compounds were both involved in the reductive activation of the methyltetrahydromethanopterin: coenzyme M methyltransferase. Micromolar concentrations of benzyl viologen or cyanocobalamin inhibited the formaldehyde conversion; these compounds, however, strongly stimulated the reduction of CoM-S-S-HTP. The results described here closely resemble observations made on the activation and reduction of CO2 to formylmethanofuran indicating that this step and the reductive activation of the methyltransferase are controlled by some common mechanism.

Key words

Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum Coenzyme M 7-Mercaptoheptanoylthreonine phosphate 5-Methyltetrahydromethanopterin: coenzyme M methyltransferase Corrinoid enzyme Reductive activation 

Abbreviations

HS-CoM

Coenzyme M, 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate

CH3S-CoM

methylcoenzyme M, 2-(methylthio)ethanesulfonate

H4MPT

5,6,7,8-tetrahydromethanopterin

MFR

methanofuran

HS-HTP

7-mercaptoheptanoylthreonine phosphate

CoM-S-S-HTP

the heterodisulfide of HS-CoM and HS-HTP

BES

2-bromoethanesulfonate

TES

N-tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl-2-aminoethanesulfonate

CN-Cbl

cyanocobalamin

HO-Cbl

hydroxycobalamin

HBI

5-hydroxybenzimidazole

DMBI

5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Servé W. M. Kengen
    • 1
  • Piet J. H. Daas
    • 1
  • Jan T. Keltjens
    • 1
  • Chris van der Drift
    • 1
  • Godfried D. Vogels
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology, Faculty of ScienceUniversity of NijmegenNijmegenThe Netherlands

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