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Anaerobic threshold and lactate turnpoint

  • H. A. Davis
  • J. Bassett
  • P. Hughes
  • G. C. Gass
Article

Summary

Venous lactate concentration and ventilatory responses to progressively increased work rates were studied in 16 men who performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion on an electrically braked cycle ergometer. In this test the characteristic curvilinear increase in venous lactate concentrations was observed. In addition to the anaerobic threshold (AT), a second breakpoint was observed and named the lactate turnpoint (LTP). Eight of the 16 subjects performed a second incremental exercise test initiated during lactic acidosis. In this test the direction of change in venous lactate concentrations was different. The work rate at which lactate concentrations again increased, after a steady decline (previously described as the AT2), was similar to the work rate established for the LTP in the first test. In the second test removal of lactate was demonstrated at work rates exceeding the AT. Although the lactate response to the two tests was different the pattern of change was similar, with the two breakpoints occurring at the same work rates. Collectively these results lend a measure of support to the hypothesis of a positive relationship between the AT, LTP, and a pattern of recruitment of motor units with different enzyme profiles. Both the AT and LTP were predictable from the ventilatory response to incremental exercise.

Key words

Incremental exercise Lactic acid Ventilation Anaerobic threshold 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. A. Davis
    • 1
  • J. Bassett
    • 1
  • P. Hughes
    • 1
  • G. C. Gass
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Biological SciencesCumberland College of Health SciencesLidcombeAustralia

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