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Androgen levels following a football match

  • C. Lupo
  • L. Baldi
  • M. Bonifazi
  • L. Lodi
  • G. Martelli
  • A. Viti
  • G. Carli
Article

Summary

In 18 trained football players, blood samples were collected before a football match, at half-time, at the end, and 45 and 90 min after the end of the match. The testosterone (T) level showed a decrease in the rest period. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) increased during the match, but returned to initial levels in the last samples. The T/DHT ratio decreased, reached the minimal value at the end of the exercise, and returned to basal levels in the rest period. Cortisol and androstenedione levels increased during the match, but returned to control levels 45 and 90 min after the end of the match, respectively. It is suggested that during this type of exercise anabolic and catabolic hormones may be simultaneously activated.

Key words

Testosterone Dihydrotestosterone Androstenedione Cortisol Football 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Lupo
    • 1
  • L. Baldi
    • 1
  • M. Bonifazi
    • 1
  • L. Lodi
    • 1
  • G. Martelli
    • 1
  • A. Viti
    • 1
  • G. Carli
    • 1
  1. 1.Istituto di Fisiologia UmanaUniversità di SienaSienaItaly

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