Determinism and locality in quantum mechanics

Abstract

In current philosophical debate Bell's theorem is often refered to as a proof of the impossibility of determinism in nature. It is argued here that this conclusion is wrong. The main consequence of the theorem is the non-local character of quantum theory itself and it is shown how this quality leads to a contradiction with the theory of relativity. If hidden variable theories are impossible, it is so because no empirically founded interpretation at all can be compatible with both quantum mechanics and relativity.

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Nordin, I. Determinism and locality in quantum mechanics. Synthese 42, 71–90 (1979). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00413705

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Keywords

  • Quantum Mechanic
  • Quantum Theory
  • Variable Theory
  • Philosophical Debate
  • Hide Variable Theory