Synthese

, Volume 82, Issue 2, pp 275–296 | Cite as

Conceptual dependency as the language of thought

  • Charles E. M. Dunlop
Article
  • 72 Downloads

Abstract

Roger Schank's research in AI takes seriously the ideas that understanding natural language involves mapping its expressions into an internal representation scheme and that these internal representations have a syntax appropriate for computational operations. It therefore falls within the computational approach to the study of mind. This paper discusses certain aspects of Schank's approach in order to assess its potential adequacy as a (partial) model of cognition. This version of the Language of Thought hypothesis encounters some of the same difficulties that arise for Fodor's account.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles E. M. Dunlop
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept of PhilosophyUniversity of Michigan, FlintFlintU.S.A.

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