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Archiv für Mikrobiologie

, Volume 59, Issue 1–3, pp 20–31 | Cite as

Methanobacillus omelianskii, a symbiotic association of two species of bacteria

  • M. P. Bryant
  • E. A. Wolin
  • M. J. Wolin
  • R. S. Wolfe
Article

Summary

Two bacterial species were isolated from cultures of Methanobacillus omelianskii grown on media, containing ethanol as oxidizable substrate. One of these, the S organism, is a gram negative, motile, anaerobic rod which ferments ethanol with production of H2 and acetate but is inhibited by inclusion of 0.5 atm of H2 in the gas phase of the medium. The other organism is a gram variable, nonmotile, anaerobic rod which utilizes H2 but not ethanol for growth and methane formation. The results indicate that M. omelianskii maintained in ethanol media is actually a symbiotic association of the two species.

Keywords

Acetate Methane Bacterial Species Oxidizable Substrate Symbiotic Association 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. P. Bryant
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. A. Wolin
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. J. Wolin
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. S. Wolfe
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Dairy ScienceUniversity of IllinoisUrbana
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of IllinoisUrbana

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