Host defense mechanisms against tumors as the principal targets of tumor promoters

  • R. Keller
Guest Editorial

Conclusion

There is now evidence that tumor-promoting agents can interfere with natural cellular defense mechanisms at diverse developmental and functional levels, resulting in various, partly opposite consequences. Such findings are in keeping with the concept that tumor promoters interfere with the formation and growth of tumors by promoting cell transformation and by stimulating the multiplication and functional capacities of transformed cells on the one hand, and on the other by interfering with key cellular effector systems involved in the host's antitumor defense.

Key words

Tumor promoters Host defense mechanisms Tumor resistance Mononuclear phagocytes “Natural killer” cells Cell differentiation Interferon Prostaglandins 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Keller
    • 1
  1. 1.Immunobiology Research Group, Institute of Immunology and VirologyUniversity of ZürichZürichSwitzerland

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