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Daily and seasonal activity in woodland ants

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Summary

Daily and seasonal foraging patterns are described for nine species of ants occupying a temperate zone woodland. Two common dominant species, Prenolepis imparis and Formica subsericea, are active at different times of day and during different parts of the year. They appear to be limited by physical factors (temperature and light, respectively) while the subordinate species show a wider tolerance of physical conditions. The subordinate species exhibit peak foraging periods which overlap in large part with most dominant species. This temporal pattern of species activity is discussed in relation to the competitive relationships within this ant guild.

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Fellers, J.H. Daily and seasonal activity in woodland ants. Oecologia 78, 69–76 (1989). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00377199

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00377199

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