Modelling and analysis of the continuous affinity-recycle extraction process: a case of specific elution with low molecular weight competitive inhibitor

Abstract

The continuous affinity-recycle extraction (CARE) process of specifie elution with low molecular weight competitive inhibitor is mathematically modelled taking into account the presence of membrane rejections to the components in a crude broth. The process performance, defined as purification factor (PF) and recovery yield (REC), is analyzed by computer simulations. The results show that for constant affinity systems (ligate and ligand as well as inhibitor) and operating conditions an optimal value of the inhibitor concentration exists to give maxima of REC and PF, and the optimal value decreases with the increase of the affinity binding constant of ligate and inhibitor. Although the increase in affinity-recycle flow rate results in the decrease of PF, an optimal value of the affinity-recycle flow rate exists to show a maximum of REC. Hence in the process design the selection of the affinity-recycle flow rate is also of importance to obtain higher REC and PF simultaneously. The consideration of membrane rejections will in practice be useful to analyse the separation of a binary broth using ultrafiltration membranes which reject to the components. For a multicomponent broth, however, membranes without rejection to all components should be employed to simplify the process design and optimization. In general, the model is useful to design a CARE process using nonporous microparticles or macromolecules as affinity supports.

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Abbreviations

C i mol/l:

contaminant concentration in feed

C 01 mol/l:

contaminant concentration in waste stream

C 02 mol/l:

contaminant concentration in product stream

e i mol/l:

ligate concentration in feed

e j mol/l:

free ligate concentration in Con. j

E lj mol/l:

concentration of ligate bound to ligand in Con.

E oj mol/l:

ligate concentration in waste (j=1) or product (j=2) stream

E tj mol/l:

total ligate concentration in Con. j

E xj mol/l:

concentration of ligate bound to inhibitor in Con. j

F e l/s:

eluant flow rate

F i l/s:

feed flow rate

F oj l/s:

flow rate of waste (j=1) or product (j=2) stream

F r l/s:

affinity-recycle flow rate

f j :

affinity binding fraction of ligate to ligand in Con.

j :

index for container No., j=1 for Con. 1 and j=2 for Con. 2

k l l/mol:

affinity binding constant of ligate and ligand

K x l/mol:

affinity binding constant of ligate and inhibitor

L o mol/l:

total ligand concentration in both containers

L j mol/l:

free ligand concentration in Con. j

PF :

purification factor

REC%:

recovery yield

R j :

rejection coefficient of total ligate in Con. j

R m :

membrane rejection coefficient of free ligate

R mc :

membrane rejection coefficient of contaminant

r e :

ratio of eluant to feed flow rate

r r :

ratio of affinity-recycle to feed flow rate

X oj mol/l:

inhibitor concentration in waste (j=1) or product (j=2) stream

X ej mol/l:

concentration of inhibitor bound to ligate in Con. j

X i mol/1:

inhibitor concentration in eluant feed

X j mol/l:

free inhibitor concentration in Con. j

X tj mol/l:

total inhibitor concentration in Con. j

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Correspondence to Y. Sun.

Additional information

The project is sponsored by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, 21st Century Science Foundation for Youth, Tianjin, and the Foundation of the State Education Commission of China.

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Sun, Y., Xue, J.L. & Dong, X.Y. Modelling and analysis of the continuous affinity-recycle extraction process: a case of specific elution with low molecular weight competitive inhibitor. Bioprocess Engineering 13, 205–210 (1995). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00367255

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Keywords

  • Waste Water
  • Water Pollution
  • Macromolecule
  • Affinity Binding
  • Process Design