Skip to main content
Log in

Coevolution of pierid butterflies and their cruciferous foodplants IV. Crucifer apparency and Anthocharis cardamines (L.) oviposition

  • Published:
Oecologia Aims and scope Submit manuscript

Summary

The oviposition behaviour of the butterfly Anthocharis cardamines has been examined, using the methods of strong inference to investigate foodplant choice. Adaptive explanations for females ovipositing mainly on unshaded, young and large individuals of Alliaria petiolata are rejected in favour of explanations based on ‘apparency’ to searching females. Floral characters shown to influence intraspecific foodplant apparency are then examined in comparisons between crucifer species, and are shown to explain well the observed deposition of A. cardamines eggs. Cruciferae such as Barbarea vulgaris and Hesperis matronalis, although poor for larval survival, receive many butterfly eggs as a result of large, persistent inflorescences. The contrasting and opposing effects of hostplant apparency and defence are discussed.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this article

Subscribe and save

Springer+ Basic
EUR 32.99 /Month
  • Get 10 units per month
  • Download Article/Chapter or Ebook
  • 1 Unit = 1 Article or 1 Chapter
  • Cancel anytime
Subscribe now

Buy Now

Price excludes VAT (USA)
Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout.

Instant access to the full article PDF.

Similar content being viewed by others

References

  • Atsatt P, O'Dowd AJ (1976) Plant defence guilds. Science 193:24–29

    Google Scholar 

  • Bazzaz FA, Harper JL (1976) Relationship between plant weight and numbers in mixed populations of Sinapis alba L. and Lepidium sativum (L.) J Appl Ecol 13:211–217

    Google Scholar 

  • Chew FS (1974) Strategies of foodplant exploitation in a complex of oligophagous butterflies. Ph D Thesis, Yale University

  • Chew FS (1977) Coevolution of Pierid butterflies and their cruciferous hostplants. II The distribution of eggs on potential foodplants. Evol 31:568–579

    Google Scholar 

  • Chun MW, Schoonhoven LM (1973) Tarsal contact chemosensory hairs of the large white butterfly Pieris brassicae and their possible role in oviposition behaviour. Ent expl et appl 16:343–357

    Google Scholar 

  • Clench H (1966) Behavioural Thermoregulation in butterflies. Ecology 47:1021–1034

    Google Scholar 

  • Courtney SP (1980) Studies on the biology of the butterflies Anthocharis cardamines (L.) and Pieris napi (L.) in relation to speciation in Pierinae. Ph D Thesis, University of Durham, England

    Google Scholar 

  • Courtney SP (1981) Coevolution of Pierid butterflies and their cruciferous foodplants. III Anthocharis cardamines (L.) survival, development and oviposition on different hostplants. Oecologia 51:91–96 (in prep). The Population biology of the Orange Tip butterfly, Anthocharis cardamines (L.) (Lep. Pier.) in northern England. submitted to Ecol Ent

    Google Scholar 

  • Dempster JP, King ML, Lakhani FH (1976) The status of the swallowtail butterfly in Britain. Ecol Ent 1:71–84

    Google Scholar 

  • Dethier VG (1959) Foodplant distribution and density and larval dispersal as factors affecting insect populations. Can Ent 91:581–596

    Google Scholar 

  • Douwes P (1976) Activity in Heodes virgaureae in relation to air temperature, solar radiation and time of day. Oecologia (Berl) 21:1–17

    Google Scholar 

  • Feeny P (1976) Plant apparency and chemical defence. Rec Adv in Phytochem 10:1–40

    Google Scholar 

  • Fox RM (1966) Forelegs of butterflies. 1. Introduction; Chemoreception. J Res Lep 5:1–12

    Google Scholar 

  • Gilbert LE (1975) Ecological consequences of a co-evolved mutualism between butterflies and plants. In: Gilbert and Raven (ed) ‘Co-evolution of Animals and Plants’. Texas Univ Press

  • Hodgson CJ (1978) The distribution and movement of apterous Myzus persicae on rapidly growing turnip plants. Ecol Ent 3:289–298

    Google Scholar 

  • Hovanitz W (1963) The relation of Pieris virginiensis Edw to Pieris napi L. J Res Lep 1:124–134

    Google Scholar 

  • Ilse D (1937) New observations on responses to colours in egg-laying butterflies. Nature 140:544–545

    Google Scholar 

  • Ives PM (1978) How discriminating are cabbage butterflies? Aust J Ecol 3:261–276

    Google Scholar 

  • Jefferson RG (1980) The phytophagous insect fauna of Mercurialis perennis L. MSc Dissertation, University of Durham, England

  • Jonasson J (1977) Frit fly, Oscinella frit L, oviposition on oat seedlings. Oikos 29:104–111

    Google Scholar 

  • Jones RE (1977) Movement patterns and egg distribution in cabbage butterflies. J Anim Ecol 46:195–212

    Google Scholar 

  • Jones RE, Ives PM (1980) The adaptiveness of searching and host behaviour in Pieris rapae (L). Aust J Ecol (in press)

  • Kennedy JS (1965) Mechanisms of hostplant selection. Ann Appl Biol 56:317–322

    Google Scholar 

  • O'Dowd DJ, Williamson GB (1979) Stability conditions in plant defense guilds. Amer Nat 114:379–383

    Google Scholar 

  • Opler PA (1974) Studies on the Nearctic Euchloe pt. VII. J Res Lep 13:1–20

    Google Scholar 

  • Rausher MD (1979) Larval habitat suitability and oviposition preference in three related butterflies. Ecology 60:503–511

    Google Scholar 

  • Rodman JE, Chew FS (1980) Phytochemical correlates of herbivory in a community of Native and Naturalized Cruciferae. Biochem Syst & Ecol, 8:43–50

    Google Scholar 

  • Rothschild M, Schoonhoven LM (1977) Assessment of egg-load by Pieris brassicae. Nature 226:352–355

    Google Scholar 

  • Saxena KM, Khuttar P (1977) Orientation of Papilio demoleus larvae in relation to size, distance and combination pattern of visual stimuli. J Insect Physiol 23:1421–1428

    Google Scholar 

  • Schweitzer DF (1979) Effects of foliage age on bodyweight and survival in larvae of the tribe Lithophanini (Lep Noct). Oikos 32:403–408

    Google Scholar 

  • Terofal F (1965) Zum problem der Wirtsspezifitat bei Pieriden (Lep) Mitt Munch Ent Gesell 55:1–76

    Google Scholar 

  • Traynier RMM (1979) Long term changes in the oviposition behaviour of the cabbage butterfly Pieris rapae induced by contact with plants. Phys Ent 4:87–96

    Google Scholar 

  • Verschaffelt E (1911) The cause determining the selection of food in some herbivorous insects. Proc Sci Acad Wet Amsterdam 3:536–542

    Google Scholar 

  • Watanabe M (1979) Population dynamics of a pioneer tree Zanthoxylum ailanthoides, a hostplant of the swallow tail butterfly, Papilio xuthus. Res Popul Ecol 20:265–277

    Google Scholar 

  • Wiklund C, Ahrberg C (1978) Hostplant, nectar source plants and habitat selection of males and females of Anthocharis cardamines. Oikos 31:169–183

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Courtney, S.P. Coevolution of pierid butterflies and their cruciferous foodplants IV. Crucifer apparency and Anthocharis cardamines (L.) oviposition. Oecologia 52, 258–265 (1982). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00363846

Download citation

  • Received:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00363846

Keywords

Navigation