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An econometric analysis of consumer demand for ivory and rhino horn

Abstract

In this paper an econometric model is used to describe consumer demand for ivory and rhino horn in Japan, using the Hendry research methodology. The demand for ivory in Japan, a final consumer, was found to be primarily income-led, with an elasticity of 0.75. International trade restrictions have had a profound effect on the ivory market since 1985. The data for rhino horn demand are less good, consisting of a time series for Japan before 1980, when international trade in rhino horn became illegal. However, analysis suggests that demand for rhino horn was also primarily income-led, with unit elasticity.

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Milner-Gulland, E.J. An econometric analysis of consumer demand for ivory and rhino horn. Environmental and Resource Economics 3, 73–95 (1993). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00338321

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Key words

  • Ivory
  • rhino horn
  • demand
  • econometric analysis
  • CITES
  • Japan