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Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 186, Issue 4, pp 475–477 | Cite as

A sensitive radioimmuno assay for thymine dimers

  • Helmut Klocker
  • Bernhard Auer
  • Helmut J. Burtscher
  • Johann Hofmann
  • Monica Hirsch-Kauffmann
  • Manfred Schweiger
Article

Summary

A sensitive radioimmuno assay (RIA) method for detection of the UV photoproduct, thymine dimers \(\left( {\overline {TT} } \right)\) has been developed. The limit of detection of this method is 6×10-14 mol or 15 pg thymine dimer. It is highly specific: A structurally similar compound such as uridine dimer \(\left( {\overline {UU} } \right)\) interferes with the detection of thymine dimers only when it is 53,000-fold or more in molar excess. Since this RIA method does not require the use of labeled DNA, it represents a considerable improvement for repair studies with radiation-sensitive cells.

Keywords

Uridine Thymine Considerable Improvement Molar Excess Similar Compound 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helmut Klocker
    • 1
  • Bernhard Auer
    • 1
  • Helmut J. Burtscher
    • 1
  • Johann Hofmann
    • 1
  • Monica Hirsch-Kauffmann
    • 1
  • Manfred Schweiger
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Biochemie (nat. Fak.)Universitaet InnsbruckAustria

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