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Biological Cybernetics

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 181–186 | Cite as

A model of Alexander's law of vestibular nystagmus

  • M. J. Doslak
  • L. F. Dell'Osso
  • R. B. Daroff
Article

Abstract

The observation that the amplitude of vestibular nystagmus grows as gaze is increased in the direction of the nystagmus fast phase and diminished with gaze in the opposite direction is known as “Alexander's law”. We have developed an analog computer model to simulate Alexander's law in nystagmus secondary to dysfunction of a semicircular canal. The model utilizes relevant brainstem anatomy and physiology and includes gaze modulation of vestibular signals and push-pull integration to create eye positition commands. When simulating normally functioning semicircular canals, the model produced no nystagmus. When simulating total impairment of the canal on one side with gaze directed maximally in the opposite direction, the model produced a large amplitude nystagmus with linear slow phases directed toward the affected side. As gaze was changed from far contralateral to ipsilateral, the nystagmus gradually diminished to zero. When simulating partial impairment of one canal, the nystagmus was smaller in amplitude and absent in ipsilateral gaze.

Keywords

Opposite Direction Computer Model Large Amplitude Analog Computer Slow Phasis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. Doslak
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • L. F. Dell'Osso
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • R. B. Daroff
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Ocular Motor Neurophysiology LaboratoryMiami Veterans Administration Medical CenterMiamiUSA
  2. 2.Department of OphthalmologyUniversity of Miami School of MedicineMiamiUSA
  3. 3.Department of NeurologyUniversity of Miami School of MedicineMiamiUSA

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