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The relationship between maximal power and maximal torque-velocity using an electronic ergometer

  • O. Buttelli
  • H. Vandewalle
  • G. Pérés
Original Article

Abstract

Eight subjects performed a single allout sprint on a cycle ergometer with strain gauges bonded to the cranks. The crank angle-torque curves of the left and right legs were recorded during ten revolutions using the software package supplied with the ergometer. Torque data were stored every 2° (180 angle-torque data per pedal revolution for each leg). The ergometer was used in the linear mode with the lowest available linear factor (F1 = 0.01). In this mode, the braking torque (TB) was proportional to cycling velocity ν(TB =F1ν) and mechanical power was equal toF1ν2. The relationship between the torque averaged over one revolution and the average velocity of one pedal revolution was studied during the acceleration phase of short allout exercise on an electronic ergometer (eight subjects) and a friction-loaded ergometer (four subjects). The present study showed that it is possible to determine the maximal torque-velocity relationship and to calculate maximal anaerobic power during a single allout sprint using an electronic cycle ergometer provided that strain gauges are bonded to the cranks. The torque-velocity relationships calculated were linear as for a friction loaded ergometer. As expected, the values of torque and maximal power measured with the strain gauges were higher than the corresponding values computed from the data collected during an allout test on a friction loaded ergometer. The torque-angle data collected during a single allout cycling exercise would suggest that angular accelerations of the leg segments and gravitational forces play the main role at high velocity.

Key words

Exercise Ergometry Anaerobic Cycling Biomechanics 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Buttelli
    • 1
  • H. Vandewalle
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. Pérés
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratoire de PhysiologieFaculté de MedecineParisFrance
  2. 2.Service de Physiologic et d'Explorations Fonctionnelles du SportGroupe Hospitalier Pitié-SalpétrièreParisFrance

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