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Human chromosomal polymorphism. V. Chromosomal Q polymorphism in African populations

Summary

The distribution pattern of Q-heterochromatin variants in seven autosomes (3, 4, 13–15, 21, and 22) was studied in three aboriginal Negroid populations of Africa (Mozambique, Angola, and Ethiopia). It was shown that among African Negroids there are no individuals completely lacking Q-heterochromatin bands with fluorescence levels 4 and 5. The mean number of Q variants per individual was 3.47, 4.80, and 4.85 in the Ethiopian, Mozambique, and Angola populations, respectively. The observed homo- and heteromorphic frequencies always agreed with those predicted by the law of Hardy-Weinberg. The populations of tropical lowland Negroids (Mozambique and Angola) proved to be significantly homogeneous both in the frequency of Q variants and the mean number of these variants per individual, so they were examined as a single group. However, comparative analysis of highland (Ethiopians) and lowland Negroids revealed statistically significant differences. The following questions are discussed: (1) the possible selective value of chromosomal Q heterochromatin material in the adaptation of human populations to high-altitude climate; (2) the possible existence of intraracial heterogeneity in Negroids living in different ecological zones of Africa; (3) the possible taxonomic value of an inverted Q-heterochromatin band in chromosome 3 in ethnic anthropology.

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Ibraimov, A.I., Mirrakhimov, M.M. Human chromosomal polymorphism. V. Chromosomal Q polymorphism in African populations. Hum Genet 62, 261–265 (1982). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00333533

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00333533

Keywords

  • Internal Medicine
  • Comparative Analysis
  • Distribution Pattern
  • Metabolic Disease
  • Human Population