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Effect of loperamide on jejunal electrolyte and water transport, prostaglandin E 2-induced secretion and intestinal transit time in man

Summary

Jejunal perfusion was performed in 12 healthy volunteers to evaluate the dose dependent effects of loperamide on intestinal absorption, stimulated secretion and transit.

In 6 volunteers intestinal perfusion of the jejunal segment with isotonic NaCl solution was followed by addition of loperamide in increasing doses (2–8 mg·l−1). The volunteers were pretreated with 1 mg·l−1 prostaglandin E2 (PgE2) in the perfusate before addition of 4 mg·l−1 loperamide. Phenolsulphonphtalein (PSP) boluses (2 ml) were given to measure mean transit time (MTT).

Loperamide 2 mg·l−1 converted the minor secretion after perfusion with the standard solution (water −1.45 ml·min−1, Na −0.09 and Cl −0.04 mmol·min−1) to absorption (water 0.93 ml·min−1, Na 0.23, Cl 0.25 mmol·min−1) within 15 min. Higher doses of loperamide did not increase absorption.

The addition of PgE2 induced net secretion of water (−4.48 ml·min−1) and electrolytes (Na −0.57, Cl −0.51 mmol·min−1). Loperamide 4 mg·l−1 significantly diminished the PgE2-induced net secretion by approximately 50%.

Loperamide dose dependently increased the MTT from 6 (2 mg·l−1) to 13.3 min (8 mg·l−1). MTT was still delayed 60 min after a wash out period (10.5 min).

It is concluded that loperamide had a dual effect or intestinal activities stimulating absorption and prolonging intestinal transit time with rising doses.

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Press, A.G., Ewe, K., Schmidt, J. et al. Effect of loperamide on jejunal electrolyte and water transport, prostaglandin E 2-induced secretion and intestinal transit time in man. Eur J Clin Pharmacol 41, 239–243 (1991). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00315436

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00315436

Key words

  • Loperamide
  • Intestinal perfusion
  • absorption
  • transit time
  • healthy volunteers
  • intestinal transport