Surgery Today

, Volume 23, Issue 7, pp 598–602 | Cite as

The psychological and cosmetic aspects of breast conserving therapy compared with radical mastectomy

  • Masakuni Noguchi
  • Yasuo Saito
  • Hiroshi Nishijima
  • Masayo Koyanagi
  • Akitaka Nonomura
  • Yuji Mizukami
  • Shinobu Nakamura
  • Takatoshi Michigishi
  • Nagayoshi Ohta
  • Hirohisa Kitagawa
  • Mitsuharu Earashi
  • Michael Thomas
  • Itsuo Miyazaki
Original Articles

Abstract

An evaluation of the psychological and cosmetic morbidity of 31 patients who had undergone breast conserving treatment (BCT group) and 71 patients who had undergone radical mastectomy (RM group) revealed that 85% and 73%, respectively, were satisfied with their operative results. BCT appeared superior to RM in relation to body image, with 93% of the BCT group indicating BCT as a future choice of treatment, whereas only 35% of the RM group indicated RM as a future choice of treatment. For 59% of the BCT patients, the results were considered excellent or good by a physician, but fear of recurrence was frequently expressed by both groups even though an early stage of breast cancer had been significantly more common in the BCT group than the RM group. Sexual adjustment was the same in both groups. Body image was thus concluded to have been improved by BCT rather than RM, but psychological morbidity was essentially the same in both groups.

Key Words

psychological morbidity cosmetic breast conserving therapy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masakuni Noguchi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yasuo Saito
    • 3
  • Hiroshi Nishijima
    • 3
  • Masayo Koyanagi
    • 4
  • Akitaka Nonomura
    • 5
  • Yuji Mizukami
    • 5
  • Shinobu Nakamura
    • 6
  • Takatoshi Michigishi
    • 7
  • Nagayoshi Ohta
    • 2
  • Hirohisa Kitagawa
    • 2
  • Mitsuharu Earashi
    • 2
  • Michael Thomas
    • 2
  • Itsuo Miyazaki
    • 2
  1. 1.The Operation CenterKanazawa University Hospital, School of Medicine, Kanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan
  2. 2.Second Department of SurgeryKanazawa University Hospital, School of Medicine, Kanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyKanazawa University Hospital, School of Medicine, Kanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan
  4. 4.Nursing DivisionKanazawa University Hospital, School of Medicine, Kanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan
  5. 5.Pathology SectionKanazawa University Hospital, School of Medicine, Kanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan
  6. 6.Third Department of MedicineKanazawa University Hospital, School of Medicine, Kanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan
  7. 7.Department of Nuclear MedicineKanazawa University Hospital, School of Medicine, Kanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan

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