Social Indicators Research

, Volume 20, Issue 4, pp 355–381 | Cite as

A review of research on the happiness measures: A sixty second index of happiness and mental health

  • Michael W. Fordyce
Article

Abstract

Eighteen years of research using the Happiness Measures (HM) is reviewed in relation to the general progress of well-being measurement efforts. The accumulated findings on this remarkably quick instrument, show good reliability, exceptional stability, and a record of convergent, construct, and discriminative validity unparalleled in the field. Because of this, the HM is offered as a potential touchstone of measurement consistency in a field which generally lacks it.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael W. Fordyce
    • 1
  1. 1.Edison Community CollegeFord MyersUSA

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