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Coral Reefs

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 71–75 | Cite as

Lipid composition of positively buoyant eggs of reef building corals

  • Iakayuki Arai
  • Misako Kato
  • Andrew Heyward
  • Yutaka Ikeda
  • Tokio Iizuka
  • Tadashi Maruyama
Reports

Abstract

Lipid composition of the eggs of three reef building corals, Acropora millepora, A. tenuis and Montipora digitata, were determined. Sixty to 70% of the egg dry weight was lipid, which consisted of wax esters (69.5–81.8%), triacylglycerols (1.1–8.4%) and polar lipids c/mainly phospholipids (11.9–13.2%). Montipora digitata also contained some polar lipids typical of the thylakoid membrane in chloroplasts, probably due to the presence of symbiotic zooxanthellae in the eggs. The wax esters appeared to be the major contributor to positive buoyancy of the eggs, and specific gravity of wax esters in A. millepora was estimated to be 0.92. Among the fatty acids of the wax esters, 34.9–51.3% was hexadecanoic acid (16:0) while the major fatty acids in polar lipids were octadecenoic acid (18:1), hexadecanoic acid (16:0), eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5) and eicosatetraenoic acid (20:4). The wax ester appears to be the main component of the 4.5 6.0 μm diameter lipid droplets which fill most of the central mass of the coral eggs.

Keywords

Lipid Specific Gravity Hexadecanoic Acid Polar Lipid Lipid Droplet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Veralg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Iakayuki Arai
    • 1
  • Misako Kato
    • 1
  • Andrew Heyward
    • 2
  • Yutaka Ikeda
    • 1
  • Tokio Iizuka
    • 1
  • Tadashi Maruyama
    • 1
  1. 1.Marine Biotechnology InstituteShizuokaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyThe University of AdelaideAdelaideAustralia

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