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Gender differences in social support among older adults

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether exposure to life stress can help explain gender differences in the use of social support. Findings from a longitudinal study suggest that as the number of stressful life events increase, elderly men and women are equally likely to become more involved in their social network, while gender differences emerge only in response to chronic financial strain. Further analysis indicates that elderly women are more likely than elderly men to report that the support they received increased their feelings of personal control.

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Additional information

This study was funded by Grant R23 AG/MH 04747 from the National Institute on Aging and a grant from the Hoog Foundation for Mental Health (Austin, Texas).

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Krause, N., Keith, V. Gender differences in social support among older adults. Sex Roles 21, 609–628 (1989). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00289174

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00289174

Keywords

  • Social Support
  • Social Network
  • Gender Difference
  • Longitudinal Study
  • Social Psychology