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Power dependence and division of family work

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Abstract

This paper reviews six explanations persistently used in the literature for the existent division of family work between spouses. These include role differentiation, socialization—ideology, relative resources, time available, economic efficiency, and the interdependence of institutions. Some difficulties with these approaches are noted, and the overall power-dependence structure of the relationship is suggested as a predictor of the extent to which spouses will share household and child care responsibility. A comprehensive model which integrates present explanations within a power-dependence framework is offered.

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Manuscript submitted October 1981, accepted May 1982.

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Hiller, D.V. Power dependence and division of family work. Sex Roles 10, 1003–1019 (1984). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00288521

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