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Toys, spatial ability, and science and mathematics achievement: Are they related?

Abstract

This review of research examines the possible relationships among children's toy playing habits, spatial abilities, and their science and mathematics achievements. Only studies that made use of United States subjects, aged 3- through 13-years-old, are included in the review. Toy playing habits, spatial ability, and science and mathematical achievement appear sex typed. Males and/or children who maintain a masculine sex role orientation tend to play with a wider variety of toys, exhibit superior spatial skills, and maintain greater science and mathematics achievement scores than females and/or children with feminine sex role orientations.

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Tracy, D.M. Toys, spatial ability, and science and mathematics achievement: Are they related?. Sex Roles 17, 115–138 (1987). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00287620

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Keywords

  • United States
  • Social Psychology
  • Spatial Ability
  • Mathematics Achievement
  • Role Orientation