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Chromosoma

, Volume 88, Issue 3, pp 227–236 | Cite as

Cytogenetics of the parthenogenetic grasshopper Warramaba virgo and its bisexual relatives

X. Patterns of fluorescent banding
  • D. Schweizer
  • M. Mendelak
  • M. J. D. White
  • N. Contreras
Article

Abstract

Combinations of DNA-binding fluorescent dyes and counterstains that enhance selectivity and contrast in primary stain fluorescence were used to differentiate types of C-bands in the genus Warramaba. Chromomycin A3 (in conjunction with two A-T binding counterstains), which identifies chromosome segments enriched in G-C base pair clusters, stains only a minority of the C-bands in Warramaba species, but these include all those known to contain 18S + 26S rRNA cistrons and most of those containing 5S rRNA genes. DAPI/actinomycin D fluorescent staining is positive for a very few bands, including two (in the Standard phylad of W. virgo) that are at or adjacent to sites containing 5S rRNA cistrons. One of the latter regions is also positively stained by DAPI/distamycin A which, in addition, highlights some centromeric bands. The fluorescent staining patterns of the Standard and Boulder-Zanthus phylads of W. virgo are significantly different, confirming their independent origin by hybridization between different races of the ancestral species “P169” and “P196”.

Keywords

Base Pair Developmental Biology Staining Pattern Chromosome Segment Fluorescent Staining 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Schweizer
    • 1
  • M. Mendelak
    • 1
  • M. J. D. White
    • 2
  • N. Contreras
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut für BotanikUniversität WienWienAustria
  2. 2.Department of Population BiologyResearch School of Biological Sciences, Australian National UniversityCanberra CityAustralia

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