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Rheumatology International

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 83–87 | Cite as

Differential abnormality in cell-cycle stage of peripheral B cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

  • M. Hara
  • A. Kitani
  • M. Harigai
  • T. Hirose
  • K. Norioka
  • W. Hirose
  • K. Suzuki
  • M. Kawagoe
  • H. Nakamura
Originals

Summary

In order to clarify the stage of abnormal activation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) B cells, we investigated the cell-cycle phase of SLE B cells by flow-cytometric analysis. This study uses the simultaneous flow-cytometric analysis of cellular DNA content and incorporated bromodeoxyuridine, an analogue of thymidine, as indicators for DNA synthesis to detect activated B cells in peripheral blood of patients with SLE. In active SLE, the percentage of B cells increased in the S and G2M phase and decreased in the G0G1 phase as compared with normal control subjects. In inactive SLE, the percentage of B cells in the S phase also increased. Active SLE B cells did not progress through the cell cycle with the stimulation of anti-IgM plus PMA or SAC plus BSF, although normal B cells transit into S and G2M phase with such stimulation. These data suggest that SLE B cells are already activated and shifted to a matured state and that for this reason the B cells were poorly responsive to mitogen.

Key words

Cell cycle B cells Systemic lupus erythematosus 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Hara
    • 1
  • A. Kitani
    • 1
  • M. Harigai
    • 1
  • T. Hirose
    • 1
  • K. Norioka
    • 1
  • W. Hirose
    • 1
  • K. Suzuki
    • 1
  • M. Kawagoe
    • 1
  • H. Nakamura
    • 1
  1. 1.First Department of Internal MedicineNational Defense Medical CollegeSaitamaJapan

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