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Rheumatology International

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 61–65 | Cite as

Rheumatic complaints in Tokelau

II. A comparison of migrants in New Zealand and non-migrants The Tokelau Island migrant study
  • R. D. Wigley
  • I. A. M. Prior
  • C. Salmond
  • D. Stanley
  • B. Pinfold
Originals

Summary

The migration of 1381 Tokelauans 15 years and over to New Zealand leaving 811 in Tokelau, provided a unique opportunity to test centuries of speculation on the impact of environment on rheumatic disease. There was no change in all rheumatic complaints. The migrant men had more gout, joint pain following injury, and neck pain. The migrant women had more dorsal back pain. There was no change in the prevalence of clinically defined osteoarthritis (COA) despite positive associations with weight and higher weights in the migrants. Rheumatoid arthritis was infrequent in both populations. Low back pain was common but was not more common in migrants, though compensation payments are readily available in New Zealand and are not in the Islands.

Key words

Tokelau Migrants Rheumatism Osteoarthritis Epidemiology 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. D. Wigley
    • 1
  • I. A. M. Prior
    • 2
  • C. Salmond
    • 2
  • D. Stanley
    • 2
  • B. Pinfold
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Research LaboratoryPalmerston North HospitalPalmerston NorthNew Zealand
  2. 2.Epidemiology UnitWellington HospitalWellingtonNew Zealand

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