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Plant Cell Reports

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 177–179 | Cite as

Shoot multiplication from mature trees of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana)

  • P. K. Gupta
  • D. J. Durzan
Article

Abstract

Opening of apical and axillary buds of mature Douglas-fir and sugar pine trees was obtained on a newly formulated basal medium (DCR) without growth regulators. Elongation of buds was observed on 1/2 strength DCR with 0.3% activated charcoal (DCR-1). In sugar pine, multiple shoots were obtained when explants on DCR with 0.5 mg/1 BAP for 5–6 weeks were transferred to DCR-1 medium. On subculture, axillary buds again developed when shoots were cultured on DCR with 0.2 mg/1 BAP for Douglas-fir and 0.5 mg/1 BAP for sugar pine. These buds were again elongated on DCR-1 medium. By subculturing 7–10 shoots of Douglas-fir and 2–3 shoots of sugar pine, over 100 shoots can be obtained in a year.

Keywords

Sugar Charcoal Growth Regulator Basal Medium Activate Charcoal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

BAP

N6-benzylaminopurine

KN

kinetin

NAA

α-naphthalene acetic acid

IAA

Indole-3-acetic acid

MS

Murashige-Skoog medium

WPM

woody-plant medium

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. K. Gupta
    • 1
  • D. J. Durzan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PomologyUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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