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Chlorpropamide-alcohol flush: a critical reappraisal

Conclusion

Further progress can depend only on standardised testing to determine the response precisely, after consideration of known interacting factors (e. g. initial cheek temperature, plasma chlorpropamide concentration). Until liver biopsy to identify the alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes becomes harmless, further studies will perhaps reveal more about the extra-pancreatic effects of one sulphonylurea than about the aetiology of Type 2 diabetes and its complications.

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Hillson, R.M., Hockaday, T.D.R. Chlorpropamide-alcohol flush: a critical reappraisal. Diabetologia 26, 6–11 (1984). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00252254

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Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Alcohol
  • Internal Medicine
  • Human Physiology
  • Metabolic Disease