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Journal of Applied Electrochemistry

, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 179–183 | Cite as

Inhibition effect of sodium boro-gluconate on mild steel with and without nitrite ions in low chloride containing water

  • I. B. Singh
  • G. Venkatachari
  • K. Balakrishnan
Papers

Abstract

As an alternative for the replacement of chromate containing corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in cooling water systems, sodium borogluconate (SBG) has been evaluated by gravimetric and electrochemical methods in water containing 100 p.p.m. Cl in an open system at ambient temperature. An inhibitor efficiency of 90% has been obtained in the presence of optimum concentration (50 p.p.m.) of SBG alone. However, the inhibition efficiency tends to decrease after 48 h of immersion due to the formation of soluble iron gluconate complexes. The formation of the complex is evident from the shift of the u.v. absorption peaks of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in the presence of gluconate ions. To stabilize the inhibitive action of SBG, NO 2 ions were added in an equal mass ratio and their combined effect was found to be very effective in maintaining inhibition efficiency up to 100 h of immersion.

Keywords

Chromate Nitrite Mild Steel Water System Cooling Water 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. B. Singh
    • 1
  • G. Venkatachari
    • 1
  • K. Balakrishnan
    • 1
  1. 1.Central Electrochemical Research InstituteTamilnaduIndia

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