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Entrapment of long-distance transported pollen grains by various moss species in coastal Victoria Land, Antarctica

Summary

In northern Victoria Land (continental Antarctica, between 72° and 76°S, 162° and 169°E), 18 moss samples have been collected and analysed for the presence of pollen. In turfs and cushions of 8 different moss species, at least 27 pollen taxa could be identified. The pinus-type pollen and those of grasses were very common. More than 60% of the total grains were damaged or could not be identified. There is evidence that the Antarctic continent could act as a sink for wind-transported pollen from sub-Antarctic islands or from plants (native or cultivated) in South America, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. However, the pollen concentration in air (⩽ 1 pollen grain/100 m3) and its entrapment rate on moss (about 0.12 grain/cm2/year) result in a very low pollen density in these plants.

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Linskens, H.F., Bargagli, R., Cresti, M. et al. Entrapment of long-distance transported pollen grains by various moss species in coastal Victoria Land, Antarctica. Polar Biol 13, 81–87 (1993). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00238539

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00238539

Keywords

  • Pollen Concentration
  • Pollen Density
  • Moss Species
  • Moss Sample
  • Pollen Taxon