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Influence of L-carnitine administration on maximal physical exercise

  • L. Vecchiet
  • F. Di Lisa
  • G. Pieralisi
  • P. Ripari
  • R. Menabò
  • M. A. Giamberardino
  • N. Siliprandi
Article

Summary

The effects of L-carnitine administration on maximal exercise capacity were studied in a double-blind, cross-over trial on ten moderately trained young men. A quantity of 2 g of L-carnitine or a placebo were administered orally in random order to these subjects 1 h before they began exercise on a cycle ergometer. Exercise intensity was increased by 50-W increments every 3 min until they became exhausted. After 72-h recovery, the same exercise regime was repeated but this time the subjects, who had previously received L-carnitine, were now given the placebo and vice versa. The results showed that at the maximal exercise intensity, treatment with L-carnitine significantly increased both maximal oxygen uptake, and power output. Moreover, at similar exercise intensities in the L-carnitine trial oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, pulmonary ventilation and plasma lactate were reduced. It is concluded that under these experimental conditions pretreatment with L-carnitine favoured aerobic processes resulting in a more efficient performance. Possible mechanisms producing this effect are discussed.

Key words

Maximal exercise L-carnitine Lactate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Vecchiet
    • 1
  • F. Di Lisa
    • 2
  • G. Pieralisi
    • 1
  • P. Ripari
    • 1
  • R. Menabò
    • 2
  • M. A. Giamberardino
    • 1
  • N. Siliprandi
    • 2
  1. 1.Istituto di Fisiopatologia MedicaUniversità di ChietiChietiItaly
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Chimica BiologicaUniversità di Padova and Centro Studio Fisiologia MitochondrialePaduaItaly

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