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Plant Cell Reports

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 50–54 | Cite as

Peanut agglutinin from callus and cell suspension cultures of Arachis hypogaea L.

  • Icy D'Silva
  • Sunil Kumar Podder
Article

Summary

Synthesis of peanut agglutinin was induced in callus and cell suspension cultures of cotyledons of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.). The lectin was synthesised in cultures through several passages. Biosynthesis of peanut agglutinin was regulated by the type and concentration of exogenous growth regulators and was positively correlated to the growth of the cultures, indicating that the agglutinin may have a role to play during cell growth. Movement of agglutinin from the cells into the medium not only facilitated easy isolation of the lectin but also provided a clue that it may probably serve as a defence molecule. The synthesized lectin purified from culture, was found to be biologically active, and was found to be comparable with the lectin from seeds, in terms of its electrophoretic mobility.

Keywords

Cell Growth Cell Suspension Growth Regulator Suspension Culture Electrophoretic Mobility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

BA

benzyladenine

2,4-D

2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid

EDTA

ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid

HAU(s)

haemagglutination unit(s)

IEF

isoelectric focusing

KN

kinetin

LS

Linsmaier and Skoog (1965) medium

Mm

medium promoting minimum growth of cells

MX

medium promoting maximum growth of cells

NAA

naphthalene-1-acetic acid

PBS

phosphate buffered saline

PMSF

phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride

PNA

peanut agglutinin

SDS-PAGE

sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

SHAA

specific haemagglutination activity

TCA

trichloroacetic acid

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Icy D'Silva
    • 1
  • Sunil Kumar Podder
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryIndian Institute of ScienceBangaloreIndia

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