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Allozyme and morphological variability, outcrossing rate and core collection formation in lentil germplasm

Summary

A survey of qualitative genetic variation at 3 morphological trait loci, 17 isozyme loci and a putative isozyme locus (amylase) was made for 105 lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus) germplasm accessions from Chile, Greece and Turkey. New alleles were found for Lap-1, Me-2, Pgm-c, Pgm-p and 6-Pgd-c. The average proportion of polymorphic loci per population was 0.19, with a range of 0 to 0.42 over populations. Germplasm from Chile was equally variable to that from Greece and Turkey on the basis of individual loci and in a multilocus sense, despite its post-Columbus introduction to the New World. Evidence was found from associations between allelic states at different loci of a complex multilocus structure of lentil populations. A single multilocus genotype represented 10.2% of all plants sampled. The rate of outcrossing varied from 2.2% and 2.9% in Turkish and Greek landraces to 6.6% among Chilean populations. Using the survey data, a random sampling strategy for core collection formation was compared with two stratified sampling methods. The advantage of stratified sampling over random sampling was only significant at P=0.28.

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Communicated by G. S. Khush

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Erskine, W., Muehlbauer, F.J. Allozyme and morphological variability, outcrossing rate and core collection formation in lentil germplasm. Theoret. Appl. Genetics 83, 119–125 (1991). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00229234

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Key words

  • Lens culinaris
  • Isozymes
  • Genetic diversity
  • Core collection
  • Cross-pollination