Ultrastructure and innervation of the swimbladder of Tetractenos glaber (Tetraodontidae)

Summary

The general structure, ultrastructure and innervation of the swimbladder of the smooth toadfish, Tetractenos glaber, were examined with light-microscopic, fluorescence-histochemical, and transmission electron-microscopic techniques. The structure of the swimbladder is similar to that of other euphysoclists. Fluorescence histochemistry showed adrenergic fibres in both the secretory and resorptive areas of the swimbladder. Transmission electron microscopy revealed two morphologically distinct axon profiles type-I profiles containing many small, flattened vesicles; type-II profiles containing both large, granular vesicles and rounded, small clear vesicles in varying proportions.

The gas-gland cells and surrounding muscularis mucosae are innervated by both type-I and type-II fibres. Type-I fibres also innervate pre-rete arteries. The rete- and gas-gland capillaries do not appear to be innervated. Arteries running to the resorptive area are innervated by type-I fibres. Both type-I and type-II profiles make contact with the muscularis mucosae in the resorptive area. Only type-I fibres innervate the radial dilator muscle in the oval sphincter region, whereas only type II fibres innervate the circular muscle of the oval sphincter.

Type-I fibres took up α-methyl-noradrenaline, and could not be found after pre-treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine. They are, therefore, assumed to be adrenergic. Type-II fibres were tentatively identified, by exclusion, as cholinergic.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  1. Augustinsson KB, Fänge R (1951) Innervation and acetylcholine splitting activity in the airbladder of fishes. Acta Physiol Scand 22:224–230.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Bennett HS, Wyrick AD, Lee SW, McNeil JH (1976) Science and art in preparing tissues embedded in plastic for light microscopy with special reference to glycol methacrylate, glass knives and simple stains. Stain Technol 51:71–97.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Berger PJ, Gibbins IL, Hards DK, Crosby LJ (1982) The distribution and ultrastructure of sensory elements in the baroreceptor region of the truncus arteriosus of the lizard, Trachydosaurus rugosus. Cell Tissue Res 226:389–406.

    Google Scholar 

  4. Burnstock G, Costa M (1975) Adrenergic neurons. Chapman and Hall, London.

    Google Scholar 

  5. Burnstock G, Iwayama T (1971) Fine structural identification of autonomic nerves and their relation to smooth muscle. Prog Brain Res 34:389–404.

    Google Scholar 

  6. Copeland E (1960) Secretory epithelium of the swim bladder in Fundulus. Biol Bull Woods Hole 119:311–312.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Deineka D (1905) Zur Frage über den Bau der Schwimmblase. Z Wiss Zool 78:149–164.

    Google Scholar 

  8. Fänge R (1953) The mechanism of gas transport in the euphysoclist swimbladder. Acta Physiol Scand 30 Suppl 110:1–133.

    Google Scholar 

  9. Fänge R (1966) Physiology of the swimbladder. Physiol Rev 46:299–322.

    Google Scholar 

  10. Fänge R (1983) Gas exchange in fish swim bladder. Physiol Biochem Pharmacol 97:111–158.

    Google Scholar 

  11. Fänge R, Holmgren S (1982) Choline acetyltransferase activity in the fish swimbladder. J Comp Physiol 146:57–61.

    Google Scholar 

  12. Fänge R, Holmgren S, Nilsson S (1976) Autonomic nerve control of the swimbladder of the goldskinny wrasse, Ctenolabrus repestris. Acta Physiol Scand 97:292–303.

    Google Scholar 

  13. Fahlen G, Falck B, Rosengren E (1965) Monoamines in the swimbladder of Gadus callarias and Salmo irideus. Acta Physiol Scand 64:119–126.

    Google Scholar 

  14. Furness JB, Costa M (1975) The use of glyoxylic acid for the fluoresence histochemical demonstration of peripheral stores of noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine in whole mounts. Histochemistry 41:335–352.

    Google Scholar 

  15. Gibbins I (1982) Lack of correlation between ultrastructural and pharmacological types of non-adrenergic autonomic nerves. Cell Tissue Res 221:551–581.

    Google Scholar 

  16. Gibbins IL, Haller CJ (1979) Ultrastructural identification of non-adrenergic non-cholinergic nerves in the rat anoccygeus muscle. Cell Tissue Res 200:257–271.

    Google Scholar 

  17. Hards DK (1983) Stain removal from methacrylate sections. Med Lab Sci 40:393–394.

    Google Scholar 

  18. Hardy GS (1983) Revision of Australian species of Torquigener Whitley (Tetraodontiformes: Tetraodontidae), and two new generic names for Australian puffer fishes. J R Soc NZ 13:1–48.

    Google Scholar 

  19. Jasiński A, Kilarski W (1969) On the fine structure of the gas gland in some fishes. Z Zellforsch 102:333–356.

    Google Scholar 

  20. McLean JR, Nilsson S (1981) A histochemical study of the gas gland innervation in the Atlantic cod, Cadus morhua. Acta Zool 62(3):187–194.

    Google Scholar 

  21. Morris S, Albright J (1975) The ultrastructure of the swimbladder of the toadfish, Opsanus tau L. Cell Tissue Res 164:85–104.

    Google Scholar 

  22. Nilsson S (1970) Autonomic innervation of the smooth muscle sphincter in the swimbladder of a fish (Gadus morhua). Acta Physiol Scand 80(4):36A-37A.

    Google Scholar 

  23. Nilsson S (1971) Adrenergic innervation and drug responses of the oval sphincter in the swimbladder of the cod (Gadus morhua). Acta Physiol Scand 83:446–453.

    Google Scholar 

  24. Nilsson S (1983) Autonomic nerve function in the vertebrates. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York.

    Google Scholar 

  25. Nilsson S, Fänge R (1967) Adrenergic receptors in the swimbladder and gut of a teleostean fish (Anguilla anguilla). Comp Biochem Physiol 23:661–664.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  26. Ross LG (1978) The innervation of the resorptive structures in the swimbladder of a physoclist fish, Polachius virens (L). Comp Biochem Physiol 61C:385–388.

    Google Scholar 

  27. Saupe M (1940) Anatomic und Histologie der Schwimmblase des Flußbarsches (Perca fluviatilis) mit besonderer Berücksichtigung des Ovals. Z Zellforsch 30:1–34.

    Google Scholar 

  28. Steen JB (1970) The swimbladder as a hydrostatic organ. In: Hoar WS, Randall DJ (eds) Fish physiology. Academic Press, New York London, pp 414–440.

    Google Scholar 

  29. Tranzer JP, Richards JG (1976) Ultrastructural cytochemistry of biogenic amines in nervous tissue: methodologic improvements. J Histochem Cytochem 24:1178–1193.

    Google Scholar 

  30. Wilson AJ, Furness JB, Costa M (1981) The fine structure of the submucous plexus of the guinea-pig ileum. II. Description and analysis of vesiculated nerve profiles. J Neurocytol 10:785–804.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Sarah L. Green.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Green, S.L. Ultrastructure and innervation of the swimbladder of Tetractenos glaber (Tetraodontidae). Cell Tissue Res. 237, 277–284 (1984). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00217146

Download citation

Key words

  • Swimbladder
  • Teleost
  • Cholinergic nerves
  • Adrenergic nerves
  • Ultrastructure