Skip to main content
Log in

High resolution climate simulation over Europe

  • Published:
Climate Dynamics Aims and scope Submit manuscript

Abstract

Three AMIP-type 10 year simulations have been performed with climate versions of the ARPEGE-IFS model in order to simulate the European climate. The first one uses the standard T42 truncation. The second one uses a high resolution T106 truncation. The horizontal resolution of the third one varies between about T200 over Europe and T21 over the southern Pacific. The winter time general circulation improves in the Atlantic sector as the resolution increases. This is true for the time-mean pattern and for the transient and low-frequency variability. In summer time and in the southern hemisphere, the 3 versions of the model produce reasonable climatologies. When restricted to the European continent, the model verification against the observed climatology shows a reduction of the biases in temperature and, to a lesser extent, in precipitation with the increase in resolution. The use of a variable resolution GCM is a valid alternative to model nesting. The model is too warm in winter and too cold in summer, too wet in northern Europe and too dry in southern Europe.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this article

Subscribe and save

Springer+ Basic
EUR 32.99 /Month
  • Get 10 units per month
  • Download Article/Chapter or Ebook
  • 1 Unit = 1 Article or 1 Chapter
  • Cancel anytime
Subscribe now

Buy Now

Price excludes VAT (USA)
Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout.

Instant access to the full article PDF.

Similar content being viewed by others

References

  • Barkstrom BR, Smith GL (1986) The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment: science and implementation. J Geophys Res 24:379–390

    Google Scholar 

  • Blackmon ML (1976) A climatological spectral study of the 500 mb geopotential height of the Northern Hemisphere. J Atmos Sci 33:1607–1623

    Google Scholar 

  • Boer G, Arpe K, Blackburn M, Déqué M, Gates WL, Hart TL, Treut H Le, Roeckner E, Sheinin DA, Simmonds I, Smith RNB, Tokioka T, Wetherald RT, Williamson D (1992) Some results from an intercomparison of the climates simulated by 14 atmospheric general circulation models. J Geophys Res 97:12771–12786

    Google Scholar 

  • Boville BA (1991) Sensitivity of simulated climate to model resolution. J Clim 4:469–485

    Google Scholar 

  • Boyle JS (1993) Sensitivity of dynamical quantities to horizontal resolution for a climate simulation using the ECMWF (cycle 33) model. J Clim 6:796–815

    Google Scholar 

  • Cariolle D, Déqué M (1986) Southern Hemisphere medium-scale waves and total ozone disturbances in a spectral general circulation model. J Geophys Res 91:10825–10846

    Google Scholar 

  • Chen JM, Miyakoda K (1974) A nested grid computation for the barotropic free surface atmosphere. Mon Weather Rev 102:181–190

    Google Scholar 

  • Courtier Ph, Freydier C, Geleyn JF, Rabier F, Rochas M (1991) The ARPEGE project at METED-FRANCE. In: Proc ECMWF Workshop on Numerical Methods in Atmospheric Modelling, 9–13 Sept 1991, vol 2, p 193–231. ECMWF, Shinfield Park, Reading, UK

    Google Scholar 

  • Courtier P, Geleyn JF (1988) A global numerical weather prediction model with variable resolution: application to the shallow water equations. Q J R Meteorol Soc 114:1321–1346

    Google Scholar 

  • Côté J, Roch M, Staniforth A, Fillon L (1993) A variable-resolution semilagrangian finite-element global model of the shallow-water equations. Mon Weather Rev 121:231–243

    Google Scholar 

  • Davies HC (1976) A lateral boundary formulation for multilevel prediction models. Q J R Meteorol Soc 102:405–418

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Déqué M, Dreveton C, Braun A, Cariolle D (1994) The ARPEGE/IFS atmosphere model: a contribution to the French community climate modelling. Clim Dyn 10:249–266

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Gates LW (1992) AMIP: the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project. Bull Am Meteorol Soc 73:1962–1970

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Geleyn JF, Bougeault P, Rochas M, Cariolle D, Lafore JP, Royer JF, Andre JC (1988) The evolution of numerical weather prediction and atmospheric modelling at the French weather service. J Theoretical Appl Mechanics 7:87–110

    Google Scholar 

  • Giorgi F (1990) Simulation of regional climate using a limited area model nested in a general circulation model. J Clim 3:941–963

    Google Scholar 

  • Giorgi F, Shields Brodeur C, Bates GT (1994) Regional climate change scenarios over the United States produced with a nested regional climate model. J Clim 7:375–399

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Giorgi F, Marinucci MR, Bates GT (1993a) Development of a second-generation regional climate model (RegCM2). Part 1: boundary-layer and radiative transfer processes. Mon Weather Rev 121:2794–2813

    Google Scholar 

  • Giorgi F, Marniucci MR, Bates GT, DeCanio G (1993b) Development of a second-generation regional climate model (RegCM2). Part II: convective processes and assimilation of lateral boundary conditions. Mon Weather Rev 121:2814–2832

    Google Scholar 

  • Grotch SL, MacCracken MC (1991) The use of general circulation models to predict regional climatic change. J Clim 4:286–303

    Google Scholar 

  • Haugen JE, Machenhauer B (1993) A spectral limited-area model formulation with time-dependent boundary conditions applied to the shallow-water equations. Mon Weather Rev 121:2618–2630

    Google Scholar 

  • Hortal M, Simmons AJ (1991) Use of reduced gaussian grids in spectral models. Mon Weather Rev 119:1057–1074

    Google Scholar 

  • IPCC (1990) Climate change; the IPCC scientific assessment. Houghton, Jenkins, Ephraums (eds) Cambridge, UK

  • Juang H-M H, Kanamitsu M (1994) The NMC nested regional spectral model. Mon Weather Rev 122:3–26

    Google Scholar 

  • Karl TR, Wang WC, Schlesinger ME, Knight RW, Portman D (1990) A method of relating general circulation model simulated climate to the observed local climate. Part I: seasonal statistics. J Clim 3:1053–1079

    Google Scholar 

  • Kida H, Koide T, Sasaki H, Chiba M (1991) A new approach for coupling a limited area model to a GCM for regional climate simulations. J Meteorol Soc Japan 69:723–728

    Google Scholar 

  • Kinter III JL, Shukla J, Marx L, Schneider EK (1988) A simulation of the winter and summer circulations with the NMC global spectral model. J Atmos Sci 45:2486–2522

    Google Scholar 

  • Legates DR, Willmott CJ (1990) Mean seasonal and spatial variability in gauge-corrected global precipitation. Int J Climatol 10:111–127

    Google Scholar 

  • Noihlan J, Planton S (1989) A simple parameterization of land surface processes for meteorological models. Mon Weather Rev 117:536–549

    Google Scholar 

  • Phillips NA, Shukla J (1973) On the strategy of combining coarse and fine meshes in numerical weather prediction. J Appl Meteorol 12:763–770

    Google Scholar 

  • Schmidt F (1977) Variable fine mesh in spectral global model. Beitr Phys Atmos 50:211–217

    Google Scholar 

  • Sharma OP, Upadhyaya H, Braine-Bonnaire T, Sadourny R (1987) Experiments on regional forecasting using a stretched coordinate general circulation model. J Meteorol Soc Japan Spec NWP Symp Vol: 263–271

  • Staniforth AN, Mitchell HL (1978) A variable-resolution finiteelement technique for regional forecasting with the primitive equations. Mon Weather Rev 106:439–447

    Google Scholar 

  • Stephenson DB, Royer JF (1995) GCM simulation of the southern oscillation and its dependence on the model horizontal resolution. Clim Dyn 11:115–128

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Déqué, M., Piedelievre, J.P. High resolution climate simulation over Europe. Climate Dynamics 11, 321–339 (1995). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00215735

Download citation

  • Received:

  • Accepted:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00215735

Keywords

Navigation